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Destruction and Reconstruction (Annotated) Richard Taylor

Destruction and Reconstruction (Annotated)

Richard Taylor

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*NOTE: From this Public Domain work, the original publication was, scanned, assembled, proofed, with additional historic photographs and text added as appropriate by the editor. – Galen C. Dukes, 2011.Translated? - General Taylor was a well educatedMore*NOTE: From this Public Domain work, the original publication was, scanned, assembled, proofed, with additional historic photographs and text added as appropriate by the editor. – Galen C. Dukes, 2011.Translated? - General Taylor was a well educated and intelligent individual, who wrote for a like audience of his time. He utilizes many metaphors to the Greek, French and Latin, which were common studies then. He expresses himself using phraseology and comparisons of which we today are unfamiliar. All of these elements combine to make this work hard for most of us in the 21st century to follow. The material is well worth reading, I consider it to be the definitive work on the Civil War, but the effort, for me, made it so tedious as to be intense labor. For that reason I decided to “translate” it into easier to understand “English.” I have made every effort maintain the original thought and opinions of the author, but in a more understandable jargon. If you had no trouble with the original, then good for you. This “translation,” is for the rest of us.General Taylor discusses the causes of the Civil War (no, it was not slavery), and the blundering mistakes that lead to it. Having been the brother-in-law to Jefferson Davis, having served with many of the Southern Generals, and having fought many of the notable Federal Generals, he gives an insight into the politics of the war, and which generals were competent and which were not. He provides us with a perspective I have not found in any other writings.History is written by the winner’s, and with all such history, “truth” is the first victim.Sherman’s memoirs are sanitized. Had he been on the losing side then after the war he would have been tried, convicted and hung for war crimes. Grant’s memoirs are much the same, written before that of Sherman, supposedly out of “respect” by Sherman, but I believe it was more of a case of “you don’t tell on me, I won’t tell on you.”Richard Taylor provides us with the broadest and clearest picture of that terrible time available today. A time almost one hundred and fifty years ago, that still brings forth deep emotions in many of the people who are descendents of those who fought and suffered through it, and its aftermath.