Home » Arabic Theology, Arabic Philosophy: From The Many To The One: Essays In Celebration Of Richard M. Frank by James E. Montgomery
Arabic Theology, Arabic Philosophy: From The Many To The One: Essays In Celebration Of Richard M. Frank James E. Montgomery

Arabic Theology, Arabic Philosophy: From The Many To The One: Essays In Celebration Of Richard M. Frank

James E. Montgomery

Published November 24th 2006
ISBN : 9789042917781
Hardcover
463 pages
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 About the Book 

In the course of his career, Professor Richard M. Frank of the Catholic University of America produced a hugely significant corpus of works on the intellectual activity in Classical Islam known as Kalam, which he argued should be rendered asMoreIn the course of his career, Professor Richard M. Frank of the Catholic University of America produced a hugely significant corpus of works on the intellectual activity in Classical Islam known as Kalam, which he argued should be rendered as speculative theology. He also wrote on the Quran, on the Arabic and Syriac philosophical tradition, and argued vigorously for a new reading of the famous religious scholar and theologian al-Ghazali (d. 1111) as a devotee of the cosmology of Ibn Sina (d. 1037). In this volume, fourteen scholars, many of them contemporaries of Professor Frank, engage with his legacy with important and seminal works which take some of his ideas as their points of departure. The book is divided into six sections: the Quran, Paths to al-Ashari, Al-Ashari and the Kalam, Christian Falsafa, Avicenna and Beyond, and Al-Ghazali on Causality. There are major articles on Quranic emendations and Arabia and Late Antiquity, on the Arabic Plotinian Tradition, on Syriac Philosophical Vocabulary, and an important reading of the Greek-Arabic translation movement in terms of the practical and exact sciences. There are seminal studies of atomism, with valuable translations of complex theological passages previously untranslated, of the Christian philosophy of Yahya ibn Adi, of a late Mutazili argument for the existence of God and a hitherto unedited section on optics by Ibn Mattawayh. These are complemented by important, close readings of Avicennas epistemology and his Metaphysics together with a major, new survey of the Avicennan tradition in the madrasas of the Islamic East. The volume ends with two discussions of the perennial question of al-Ghazalis theory of causality. In addition, the volume contains an autobiographical piece by Professor Frank and a complete bibliography of his published works.